If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

We are Open and actively seeing patients at the office.

Tuesday, 23 November 2021 00:00

Ankle sprains can occur when one or more ligaments in the ankle are overstretched or torn, usually due to a sudden, twisting injury of the ankle. Sprains can range from mild to severe, but in all cases, a full recovery is vital to prevent future ankle injuries. For all ankle sprains, it is important to protect the sprained ankle from further injury by resting it. Applying ice, compressing, and elevating the injured ankle can help reduce swelling and inflammation. Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs can be useful for pain management. Gentle stretching and strengthening exercises can help during the recovery process as well. Moderate to severe sprains will usually require further treatments to ensure proper healing. These may include footwear modifications, wearing orthotics, going to physical therapy, wearing an ankle brace or support, and in particularly severe cases, undergoing surgery to repair a torn ligament. If you have sprained your ankle, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact one of our podiatrists from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Tuesday, 16 November 2021 00:00

Posterior tibial nerve neuralgia, also known as tarsal tunnel syndrome, is a nerve disorder that is caused by compression of the posterior tibial nerve. This nerve runs through the tarsal tunnel, an area along the inside of the ankle that houses nerves, blood vessels, and tendons. When the posterior tibial nerve is compressed, it causes symptoms such as foot, ankle, and toe pain, a pins and needles sensation in the foot, and numbness. Conservative treatments such as resting and icing the foot, wearing orthotics, and taking pain medications can help relieve symptoms. For more information about tarsal tunnel syndrome and to discover the best course of treatment for you, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact one of our podiatrists of Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Monday, 15 November 2021 00:00

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 09 November 2021 00:00

 

The band of tissue on the bottom of the foot, called the plantar fascia, plays a very important role in your body. It attaches the front of the foot to the heel bone, absorbs the body’s weight and pressure during movement, and  supports the arch. There are a number of conditions or situations that overly stress the plantar fascia. Included are obesity, age, pregnancy, standing for prolonged periods of time, physical activities that strain the heel, or having high arches, flat feet and other conditions that cause you to over-pronate (roll your foot inwardly as you move). This excessive stress on the plantar fascia can irritate it or even tear it, causing it to become inflamed and painful. Podiatrists have a great deal of experience in treating plantar fasciitis as it is the leading cause of heel pain. A podiatrist may use tests such as an MRI, X-ray or ultrasound to properly diagnose plantar fasciitis and rule out other ailments that also cause heel pain. Other methods a podiatrist may use to reduce pain and treat plantar fasciitis include physical therapy, night splints that gently stretch the plantar fascia, orthotics that correct can help distribute weight more evenly, steroids to reduce inflammation and pain, and shock wave therapy that initiates the body’s healing response. In severe cases, surgery may be needed to help remove scar tissue or release tension and swelling. If you are experiencing any kind of heel pain, have it checked out by a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists  from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Connect with us