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February 2021

Monday, 22 February 2021 00:00

What Are the Symptoms of a Broken Toe?

Patients who stub their toe against a piece of furniture, or drop a heavy object on it, may experience a broken toe. The average healing time for this type of injury is generally four to six weeks, and it is often accompanied by swelling and bruising. Additional symptoms can include severe pain and it may be difficult to put a shoe on and walk. Mild relief can be found if you have a mildly fractured toe by taping the affected toe to the toe next to it. This is referred to as buddy taping, and it is typically effective in providing the necessary stability to the affected toe as the healing process occurs. Severely broken toes may require that a cast be worn, and it can be helpful to use crutches to keep weight off of the toe. If you have fractured your toe, please consult with a podiatrist.

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Monday, 15 February 2021 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Monday, 15 February 2021 00:00

Can Stretches Help Cuboid Syndrome?

The outer side of the foot is generally where pain from cuboid syndrome is felt. It develops as a result of a displaced cuboid bone, and can happen for several reasons. These can include having weak tendons in the feet, wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, or conditions such as flat feet or high arches. This bone is located between the pinky toe and the heel, and repetitive force may shift the bone out of alignment. Common symptoms many patients feel can consist of swelling on the outside of the foot, pain while standing or walking, and pain and discomfort may extend to the sole of the foot. There are stretches that can be practiced that may help to alleviate the pain. It is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to manage cuboid syndrome.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with one of our podiatrists from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome

Sever’s disease occurs when the bones in the calves grow faster than the Achilles tendon, which connects the heel bone to the calf muscle. When this happens, the tendon begins to tighten, and the heel becomes swollen and sore. Sever’s disease often affects children between the ages of 9 and 13 who are participants in running and jumping sports such as soccer, gymnastics, baseball, basketball, and football.  There is rarely swelling as a result, and most often, the heel pain is worse when running with shoes that have limited support. The pain usually goes away with rest and does not have an impact with low impact sports such as cycling and swimming. If your child complains of heel pain, you should take them to see a podiatrist for a proper examination. Upon examination, a podiatrist will be able to provide a proper diagnosis and treatment method.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see one of our podiatrists from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 01 February 2021 00:00

Understanding Sesamoiditis

Pain in the sesamoid bones, which are located beneath the metatarsal bone under the big toe, is known as sesamoiditis. Sesamoiditis usually comes on gradually and is indicated by a mild ache that increases to an intense throbbing. Increasing activity that puts pressure on the ball of the foot often leads to this condition. Having a bony foot or high arches can put more pressure on the sesamoid bones, which can lead to inflammation. Treatment options for sesamoiditis are noninvasive. Mild cases usually require rest and possibly a shoe pad that reduces pressure on the bones. More severe cases may require the big toe to be immobilized in order to allow for healing. Ice and anti-inflammatories may be helpful in decreasing inflammation. If you are struggling with pain in your sesamoid bones, it is important to consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact one of our podiatrists of Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis
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