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Dr. Spriro is a Participating Provider with the Beth Israel Lahey Physicians Organization

February 2022

Monday, 28 February 2022 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, you may have heard that performing certain exercises can help alleviate pain and speed up your recovery. There are a variety of stretches that you can do to help with plantar fasciitis. One of the easiest stretches is flexing your foot up and down 10 times prior to standing after a long period of rest (when plantar fasciitis pain is at its worst). There are also certain exercises that you should avoid. These include any jumping activities and any high impact exercises, such as running. If you are suffering from plantar fasciitis, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis

Sometimes ankle pain can be caused by an impinged or irritated sural nerve. This condition is known as sural neuritis. The sural nerve runs along the back of the leg, and around the outside of the ankle and foot, providing sensation to these areas as well as to the outer two toes. The sural nerve can become injured or irritated in a variety of ways. It can get stretched and injured during an ankle sprain or some other injury. Also, since its course around the ankle and lateral side of the foot can vary, it may inadvertently get injured during a surgical procedure in the area. Even scar tissue or swelling that occurs after an injury or surgery can affect the nerve. Sural neuritis typically causes a burning sensation, which is sometimes accompanied by tenderness and swelling along the side of the ankle and foot. If you experience this type of pain, it’s a good idea to make an appointment with a podiatrist. If you are diagnosed with sural neuritis, your podiatrist may develop a course of treatment that includes desensitizing the nerve through massage, medications, corticosteroid injections, and specific footwear to offload pressure on the nerve and reduce irritation. Surgery may be necessary if these more conservative treatments do not provide sufficient pain relief.

Ankle pain can have many different causes and the pain may potentially be serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Ankle Pain
Tuesday, 08 February 2022 00:00

The Brannock Device

If you’ve ever been to a shoe store and had your feet measured, the salesperson likely used a portable metal tool called a Brannock device. This handy item can determine the length and width of your feet, ensuring that you know what size shoes you should be wearing. There are various types of Brannock devices. Some are made specifically for men’s, women’s, or children’s feet. Others are built for sizing specific types of shoes, such as sneakers or ski boots. To find out your shoe size, it is strongly suggested that you go to a store where your feet can be properly measured. Wearing the correct shoe size can significantly benefit your foot health. To learn more about how the fit of your footwear affects your feet, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Getting the right shoe size is an important part of proper foot health. Seek the assistance of Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor will provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Getting the Right Shoe Size

There are many people who wear shoes that are the incorrect size, negatively affecting their feet and posture. Selecting the right shoes is not a difficult process, so long as you keep several things in mind when it comes to choosing the right pair.

  • When visiting the shoe store, use the tools available to measure your foot.
  • Be sure there is ‘wiggle room’. There should be about an inch between your toes and the tip of your shoes.
  • Do not always assume you are the same size, as manufacturers run differently.
  • Purchase shoes later in the day, as your feet swell as the day progresses.
  • If a shoe is not comfortable, it is not suitable. Most shoes can’t be ‘broken in’, and comfort should be the ultimate goal when it comes to choosing the right pair of shoes

As our feet hold our body weight and keep us moving, it is important to treat them right. Picking the right pair of shoes can provide your feet comfort and mobility without pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Getting the Right Shoe Size

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 01 February 2022 00:00

Who Needs an ABI Test?

An Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) test is a screening tool that is used to assess circulation in the lower limbs. During an ABI test, the doctor takes your blood pressure at various points along your arms and lower legs and compares the numbers to determine your risk of having full or partial blockages in the blood flow of your lower limbs. Not everyone needs an ABI test. They are typically done for people who are at risk of peripheral artery disease, a condition characterized by poor circulation in the extremities. People who are at risk of having peripheral artery disease include those with a history of smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, as well as older adults and people who have a family history of peripheral artery disease. To learn more, please consult with a podiatrist.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Vascular Testing in Podiatry
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