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Dr. Spriro is a Participating Provider with the Beth Israel Lahey Physicians Organization

April 2022

Tuesday, 26 April 2022 00:00

Facts About Arthritis

Arthritis has long been considered an ailment of the elderly, but a variety of other people are actually experiencing some form of arthritis, even children. Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints that produces pain, swelling, and muscle stiffness that often affect the toes, feet, and ankles. Among the causes are the deterioration of cartilage that then endangers the bones, an attack of the autoimmune system, smoking, previous injury, over-exercising or repetitive stress, serious infections, and heredity. There are many types of arthritis, including rheumatoid, psoriatic, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, gout, ankylosing spondylitis, lupus and juvenile. The most easily recognizable symptoms of arthritis include pain and swelling in the joints, redness, difficulty in walking or moving the joints, stiffness in the morning, and tenderness to the touch. Many treatments are available that allow you to live with this condition. If you think you or your child may have arthritis, it is a good idea to contact a podiatrist for a complete examination and diagnosis, as well as possible treatment plans.  

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a term that is commonly used to describe joint pain.  The condition itself can occur to anyone of any age, race, or gender, and there are over 100 types of it.  Nevertheless, arthritis is more commonly found in women compared to men, and it is also more prevalent in those who are overweight. The causes of arthritis vary depending on which type of arthritis you have. Osteoarthritis for example, is often caused by injury, while rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a misdirected immune system.

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Decreased Range of Motion

Arthritic symptoms range in severity, and they may come and go. Some symptoms stay the same for several years but could potentially get worse with time. Severe cases of arthritis can prevent its sufferers from performing daily activities and make walking difficult.

Risk Factors

  • Occupation – Occupations requiring repetitive knee movements have been linked to osteoarthritis
  • Obesity – Excess weight can contribute to osteoarthritis development
  • Infection – Microbial agents can infect the joints and trigger arthritis
  • Joint Injuries – Damage to joints may lead to osteoarthritis
  • Age – Risk increases with age
  • Gender –Most types are more common in women
  • Genetics – Arthritis can be hereditary

If you suspect your arthritis is affecting your feet, it is crucial that you see a podiatrist immediately. Your doctor will be able to address your specific case and help you decide which treatment method is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Care for Your Arthritic Foot
Wednesday, 20 April 2022 00:00

Why Your Ankle May Hurt Without an Injury

 

Ankle pain that is sudden, and not due to an injury, may be caused by any number of causes, including certain arthritic conditions. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis can sometimes negatively affect the tissue and cartilage (respectively) in ankles, causing pain and swelling. Similar symptoms can be present when reactive arthritis affects the ankle. This is a condition which is triggered by a bacterial infection elsewhere in the body. Gout is another type of arthritis in which excessive amounts of uric acid crystalize on joints. Gout usually affects the big toe, but it can also affect the ankle. Another disease that sometimes affects the ankle joint causing stiffness, pain and swelling is scleroderma. Bursitis is a condition in which the cushioning bursa sac at the back of the ankle becomes inflamed from stress or overuse and produces pain and inflammation. If you rupture or tear the tendon that connects your calf muscle with your heel (Achilles tendon), you can develop a condition known as Achilles tendonitis. These are just a few of the conditions that may cause ankle pain without injury. Whatever the cause, it is important to have your ankle pain properly diagnosed in order to receive the proper treatment. Call a podiatrist if you are experiencing any pain in your ankle. 


 

Ankle pain can be caused by a number of problems and may be potentially serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Bursitis
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Ankle Pain
Tuesday, 12 April 2022 00:00

Dealing With a Bunion

A bunion is a bony protrusion of the foot, caused when the big toe pushes inward toward the other toes, and the head of the metatarsal below it pushes outward. This deformity, called hallux valgus, can become quite painful, because the bump that is formed rubs against the side of the shoe, becoming red and sore. Bunions also negatively affect how you walk and distribute your weight, and can cause other painful conditions, like metatarsalgia (pain in the ball of the foot), and hammertoe. Common causes for bunions include wearing shoes and socks that do not allow for proper movement in the toe box, wearing high heels with pointy toes, and genetics. Several pads and braces are available over the counter to help ease the pain of bunions and temporarily straighten the toe. But as a rule, once a bunion is formed, the toe will not straighten out on its own. In the end, surgery is the most realistic treatment option, and even then, your toe may never be perfectly straight. If you have a bunion that is interfering with the activities in your life, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for an examination and treatment plan.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS of Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What Are Bunions?
Monday, 11 April 2022 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Tuesday, 05 April 2022 00:00

What Are Heel Spurs?

Heel spurs, or “enthesophytes,” develop on the heel of the foot. There are two types of heel spurs associated with different heel problems. One type of heel spur is called a Plantar Spur. It is linked to a problem called “Heel Spur Syndrome” and is a bone spur that develops on the bottom of the heel, on the sole of the foot where the plantar fascia (a band of fibrous tissue that stretches along the bottom of the foot) connects to the heel bone. People who have plantar fasciitis are prone to developing these kinds of spurs, which are the bone’s response to stress from straining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia, or repeated tearing of the thin lining of the heel bone. They are also associated with age, obesity, and osteoarthritis. Heel spurs are less likely to feel painful. The other type of heel spur is a Dorsal Spur and is connected to a problem called “Insertional Achilles Tendonitis,” a condition where a bone spur develops at the back of the heel, where the Achilles tendon fits into the bone. If you notice a bony protrusion on the heel of your foot or have pain in this area, it is best to consult with a podiatrist who can diagnose the problem and recommend proper treatment.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Jordana Szpiro, DPM, FACFAS from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

Read more about How to Treat Heel Spurs
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